Preserving Our Cultural Heritage

Our cultural heritage is a precious gift bequeathed upon us by our ancestors and it is our responsibility to cherish and safeguard it for future generations. YÉOL, with the support of experts and like-minded supporters, intends to be one of the pillars in the preservation of our rich cultural heritage.

  • Period
  • 2010~2013
  • Location
  • Jeollanam-premises yulchonmyeon Sinpungri 1
  • Classification
  • nursing homes
  • Designated Date
  • in 1909

Archive Preservation for Yeosu Aeyangwon

The history of Yeosu Aeyangwon, a leprosarium, begins in 1909 with an American medical missionary named Wiley H. Forsythe who treated a leper lying on the street. Relocated to Yeosu from Gwangju in 1927, it was first called Biederwolf Leper Colony and in 1935 its name was changed to the present name of Aeyangwon. Dr. E. T. Boyer was the head of Aeyangwon in the 1950s and was later succeeded by Dr. Stanley C. Topple. In 1972 it was remodeled as a nursing home, but was then neglected until 2000 when the Yeosu Hospital reopened it as the Yeosu Aeyangwon History Museum. YÉOL has supported the cataloguing and translation of the Aeyangwon archives, which include medical tools from the early modern period and records of missionary work.

  • Period
  • 2002~present
  • Location
  • Ulsan Ulju Eonyang Bangudae depth 285 (Daegokri)
  • Classification
  • National Treasure No. 285
  • Designated Date
  • May 23, 1995

Supporting the Exhibition for Ulsan Bangudae Petroglyphs

The Ulju Bangudae Petroglyphs is a prehistoric rock engraving that stands 3 meters tall and 10 meters wide, and it depicts images of whales, deer, tigers, wild boars and other assorted animals, in addition to, boats, harpoons, fishing nets, and humans. It was first discovered in 1971 and was designated National Treasure No. 285 in 1995. But due to the nearby Sayeon Dam, which was built before the petroglyph was discovered, the rock cliff on which the engravings are carved is submerged for half the year, and the repetitive process has eroded the petroglyph to the point that it is in dire need of preservation measures.